Review: End of Eden by S.L Jennings (Seven Sinners #2) Kindle Unlimited

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S.L Jennings does erotic scenes and romance well. What I didn’t expect was the darkness that came with this second instalment of the seven sinners series.

The first book in this series focuses very much on the female leads romantic relationship with Legion, a strong, serious and tortured fallen angel.

The second book – let’s just say that you feel the emotions as the character experiences them. This isn’t your typical happy romance conflict. This book is full of little twists that you don’t expect as well as uncertainty.

Eden, the female heroine, remains her strong self in the face of conflict. But at what emotional cost? The journey that Eden goes on in this book is what makes this series great.

5/5 again from S.L Jennings.

Love the tie in with the dark light characters.

(Spoiler: if you’ve missed Niko, you’ll love this book)

M x

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Review: Trickery by Jaymin Eve & Jane Washington

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Trickery is a brilliant example of a fantasy series starting with a bang, and getting you hooked right from the start. Honestly, there were so many seeds planted in this novel that I can’t wait to read the rest of the series to watch them come into fruition.

The premise is deliriously good. A society where the gods essentially live on earth until the die and ascend. The prejudices and class divides make for brilliant dynamics between the main characters.

I began to feel a reverse harem vibe once all of the lead male characters were introduced, and whereas this premise normally makes me uncomfortable if it is done in a tacky way, this was executed in a way that tied into the plot in an intriguing way.

This book deserves a five out of five. Such an addictive story and I honestly cannot wait for the rest of the books.

Willa Knight: Dweller. Slave. Non-magical being.

In Minatsol, being a dweller means that you are literally no better than dirt. In fact, dirt might actually be more useful than Willa. Her life will be one of servitude to the sols, the magic-blessed beings who could one day be chosen to become gods.

At least her outer village is far removed from the cities of the sols, and she won’t ever be forced to present herself to them… Until one small mistake changes everything, and Willa is awarded a position to serve at Blesswood, the top sol academy in the world—a position that she definitely did not earn.

Under the sudden, watchful eye of the gods, she will be tasked to serve the Abcurse brothers, five sols built of arrogance, perfection and power. They are almost gods themselves, and under their service she is either going to end up sentenced to death, or else they are going to ruin her so badly that she will wish for it.

Either way, she is in trouble.

Jane Washington is a fave of mine ever since ‘Charcoal Tears’, but I have never read anything from Jaymin Eve, but now I think I will.

This was a good combo of authors and such an example of good fantasy fiction.

M x

Review: Crown of Lies / Throne of Truth by Pepper Winters (Truth and Lies Duet Series)

 

 

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The truth and lies duet series is tame, compared to some of Pepper Winter’s other series’. Particularly the new Dollars series sticks in my mind as one of my new favourites. That being said: Winters’s writing has an addictive quality that can make the darkest depravity into a relatable and curious read.

The Truth and Lies duet is about a young heiress, who decides to escape her life for a night only to be almost assaulted and then rescued. Her rescuer, Nameless, is then arrested. The story begins from there.

I loved the first book in the series vehemently.

Particularly the lead heroine, Elle Charleston, a strong independent woman with strong family ties.

I found it difficult to relate to Penn Everett (main male) in the first book, namely because he is a very brusque character and quite aggressive. However, the very thing that made him difficult to relate to is actually the backbone of the series. In the second book, when Penn’s character shows vulnerability due to plot points (no spoilers) I found that I missed his strong and violent personality. I missed his over-confidence.

The first book was a brilliant exercise in character development, although not as dark as I am used to with Pepper Winter’s work. The second book was more of a plot driven conclusion, although I would have liked more background on the lead villains’ as it felt like they were not properly explored enough to give their actions emotional weight in the series.

I give this series four out of five.

M x